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How to Write Your Resume for the Internal Positions

Updated: Dec 15, 2022




Are you ready for the next step in your career? You are determined to find a better job with higher pay in a perfect company that will give you all you want.


Wait!


Sometimes, it's best to apply for a recently opened internal position and get promoted within the same company. You may not always find what you expect from a job at a totally unknown company.


If your current company's compensation and benefits are satisfactory and you like the culture, coworkers and growth opportunities, why don't you consider to seek promotion or change your position within the current company. At least you know what to expect!


According to a report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most companies first advertise open positions to its employees before posting them on external job boards. So start your job search in your current company.


Most people believe that you only need a resume and a cover letter when applying for an external job, but in reality, you also need it ready for the positions in your current organization.




What is an internal resume?


An internal resume specifically shows your contributions, education, skills, experience and accomplishments relevant to your current job and company.


It's almost the same as applying externally at your job searching, but in an internal resume, you need to show what you have accomplished while working in your current company and why you are a good fit for the new position.




The importance of an internal resume

According to Melody Wilding at Forbes magazine, most candidates who apply for internal jobs fail in interviews because they are not well prepared. They think they'll be hired right away because they have already worked at the same company and everyone knows how good they are at their current job.


According to Monster.com, just because you already work at the company you are applying to does not mean you'll be hired right away.


You do not know the caliber of the external candidate you are dealing with. You need to be vigilant and build a support network, especially in the department you are applying to.


Also, it would be a smart move to leverage your success within the company. You can also take advantage of being an insider by asking smart questions about the job and showing the recruiter that you are up to speed.




How to write an internal resume

Preparing for the interview is one thing, but you need to write your internal resume in a way that grabs the hiring team's attention.


Below are some tips on how to write a perfect resume for an internal position.




1. Be very specific.

Before you start writing your resume, think about your future and career goals. If you do not have specific goals about why you are applying for the new job and where you see yourself in the next 5 years, you do not stand a chance.


You need to be very specific about what you like about your current job and what your priorities are for your new job (salary, location, growth, leadership skills, etc.).


When writing your internal resume, you should start from scratch because you will lower your chances, if you do not outline your newly acquired skills and your contribution to the company in your current position.


 
 


2. Create a detailed summary



Write a summary about yourself, your career goals and aspirations, and your current job.


You need to create a resume profile to get management's attention. In a single introductory paragraph, you showcase your skills, experience with the company, your accomplishments and your passion to advance your career in your company.


Keep reading below about the details of a resume profile.




3. What exactly is a resume profile?

A resume profile includes your years of experience, education, accomplishments, goals, and relevant skills. You can either write a short paragraph or use bullet points; it all depends on your writing style.


"I have been in the hotel industry for 5 years and am an experienced, well-trained and skilled housekeeper who has ensured the cleanliness of the lounge and 80 guest rooms during that time. As the head housekeeper, it was my job to instruct the 20+ younger housekeepers on the complex procedures and operations of the hotel. With all of the complex operations, I demonstrated excellent leadership, planning and coordination skills. I am ready to take on the responsibility of Head Housekeeping at Hotel HYATT to further my professional development."


Or you can write the same in bullet points as follows.

  • Trained and lead housekeeper with 5 years of experience in the hotel industry, ensuring that the cleanliness of the lounge and 80 guest rooms is a top priority.

  • Assisted in training nearly 20+ junior housekeepers in hotel procedures and creating schedules.

  • Excellent leadership, planning and coordination skills in the midst of all the complex processes.


Go into detail and highlight your accomplishments. What you did and how you did it. Bring up the numbers and data that you think would impress the hiring manager.


 
 


4. Focus on how you contributed to the company

Do not list all the experiences you have had in your professional life. Highlight only the experiences you have had at your current company, i.e. the company you are applying to for the new job. Demonstrate your skills with some concrete results and goals achieved. For example;


"In my current job, I have developed a unique method for scheduling appointments with customers that has resulted in a 75% fewer appointment errors."


Another example might be as follows.


"I led a situational training program for entry-level employees that increased customer satisfaction by 20% in 90 days."




5. Write a combination of hard and soft skills



These days, recruiters are more interested in the hard ad soft skills you have acquired during your current job.


They want to know if you are capable of learning new skills and if you can handle the challenges of the new job.


Your education is not that important in an internal application, but you can mention it at the end if someone is interested in it.


 
 



6. Use performance appraisals

You can take a cue from the performance appraisals that management creates at the end of each year and use the items that management believes will contribute to your success in the company.


These appraisals are written by trained professionals and therefore already have the format you want. Using the same wording will make your resume and cover letter stand out from the rest.




7. Do your homework

To get the job you want, sometimes all you need to do is to thoroughly research the position you are applying. So do your due diligence!


Your cover letter and resume should be tailored to the requirements of the new position.


As an employee of the same company, you will have first-hand information about the job description. If you do not have this information, you can simply ask someone at Human Resources or in the department what skills are required for the job you want.


You can research on the Internet before you go to the interview to increase your chances of being hired.




Build a network

If you have many contacts inside and outside the company, now is the time to use them. Talk to your colleagues and supervisors if they have applied for an internal position and get tips from them.


You can ask them to make a strong case for you. Their support and recommendation can increase your chances of being selected.


 
 



Companies prefer internal applicants



According to Hilary Smith companies prefer to hire someone from within the company who is already familiar with the company culture.


Rather than hiring a new and unfamiliar person who needs time to learn the ropes, they usually prefer an internal person who has already done the required tasks efficiently with a perfect work ethic.




Conclusion

It is a common misconception that only external candidates can bring new and fresh ideas.


In today's workplace, the workforce is already diverse, and there is a lot of brainstorming and fresh ideas within the organization.


It's not necessary that only external applicants can bring new approaches, existing employees can do the same hard work and in most cases even better.


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